Posts Tagged ‘facebook for wineries’

Social Media Quick Tip: Tag Your Favorite Wine Brands on Facebook

This is old news for some, but if you haven’t explored the status tagging feature (similar to photo tagging) on Facebook, take a few minutes and check it out.

Status tagging can help your winery’s Facebook fan page to become more engaging and vibrant.  Facebook users can type the “@” symbol before a Facebook fan page name that they’re a fan of along with the first few letters of the fan page right after the @ sign, and Facebook begins to populate your friends names and fan pages for you to click on, creating a direct link to the page (or personal profile) and also appearing on that fan page or profile.

For example, you work for a winery.  Your personal profile oftentimes has updates about your day at the winery, but those updates don’t make it over to your winery’s fan page because you’re running short on time.  Here’s what you can do to save time and get your fan page updated more easily.

1. Go to your personal profile.

2. Type your update text into the “What’s On Your Mind” box and be sure to type @xyzwinery within your update text.  You’ll see choices pop up after you type the @ symbol.  (ie Just finished bottling  2008 @xyzwinery Cabernet Franc with barely a bottle broken!)

3. Click on the appropriate fan page link after the @ symbol and finish your update.

The update will now appear on both your personal profile page and the winery’s fan page if they allow links from fans to show on their wall.  If your winery doesn’t allow links from fans, I highly recommend that you do so by adjusting your fan page settings.  Organic content from fans is the lifeblood of a successful fan page.

I bet you have some Facebook-savvy customers who will follow your lead and tag their updates about you and their wine experiences with you.  Let’s help each other out and tag other wineries and businesses on Facebook when we’ve visited them.   (I don’t seem to have the ability to status tag from my blackberry’s Twitterberry app just yet)

Photo credit: respres flickr photos http://www.flickr.com/photos/respres

Interview: Facebook’s Andrew Bosworth Talks Facebook for Wine Businesses

Video Source: WITS YouTube Channel

Here’s a video interview from the Wine Industry Technology Summit earlier this year that addresses some basics of how Facebook can help wineries differentiate their brands.  There’s also some discussion around privacy settings, content appropriate for personal profiles vs. business fan pages.

Key takeaways:

  • Emphasis on the importance of telling a story
  • Engage with your customers
  • It’s not enough to have a good wine product, how will you differentiate your wine?
  • Find the stories that consumers can latch onto
  • Your ability to communicate with multiple people via social media is greatly increased as opposed to private, individual email responses
  • If you’re not sure if you should post something on Facebook, don’t post it.
  • Facebook helps you connect in a richer, more dynamic way than traditional channels

I’ve noticed an increase in the number of Harvest reports via video, photos and posts on Facebook and Twitter here in Finger Lakes Wine Country this year.  Are you noticing an increase in interest or conversation around Harvest this year from consumers because of the reports?  Do you expect these Harvest stories to help you sell wine and wine club memberships? Any other benefits to report?

Social Media Quick Tip: Add Social Media Info to Signage

july 2009, wbc, personal 055

I bet a bunch of you are already all over this one.  I spotted this signage from Faust Winery in Napa Valley during the Grand Tasting of Napa Wines at Quintessa during the recent Wine Bloggers Conference.

This is a simple, low-cost branding strategy to promote your social media efforts.  Once you get your customers there, you know what happens eventually: they’ll start talking to you and hopefully providing valuable information on their likes and dislikes, preferences and experiences with your wine brand.

Although this sign was on a table at a tasting, you can also create signage that is representative of your brand’s look and feel and post them in your tasting room, create postcards, add your social media info to your business cards, print out pages and include in the bottom of customer shopping bags, include in your shipment boxes.

If you’re a winery who is already promoting your pages this way, I would love to have you upload your photos to the fan photos section of my Facebook fan page.  That way we can see each other’s signage and use the photos for info on how to fan each other’s pages.

And it certainly doesn’t hurt to have a smiling staff member to promote the info either.

july 2009, wbc, personal 054

Winery Facebook Fan Page: Ceja Vineyards

Amelia, Pedro, Armando and Martha Ceja

Amelia, Pedro, Armando and Martha Ceja

Okay wineries.  I bet you have your Facebook fan page up and running.  You update it with event details, photos from your winery, photos of your bottles and labels, new release announcements.  You’re thinking that you’re on track and ahead of the pack, right?

Although these are all great elements for your page, take your strategy one step further.  Gather your staff and have a no-holds-barred discussion of what it is about your winery that your customers and wine club members LOVE about you.  Make sure that that core of your brand is woven into each and every post.  Ceja Vineyards in Napa and Sonoma is a great example of a winery fan page that does this very effectively.  Here’s why:

  • Ceja Vineyards is founded by a Latino family of first-generation Mexican-American winegrowers from Napa and Sonoma Valleys named Amelia, Pedro, Armando and Martha Ceja.
  • The Cejas’ page exudes a tight-knit, hard-working family winery that is proud of its heritage and carries its fun, warm Latino roots into each post.  The Ceja Vineyards staff all contribute to the page and there’s a familiar, friendly voice that says, “Hola Friends!”
  • For example, a Ceja Vineyards staff person posted that it was Amelia Ceja’s birthday along with a picture of her.  Amelia received birthday wishes there from fans.
  • The page has a post that links to a cool wine and music site that features Ceja Vineyards wines with music from Tito Puente, a famous Latin jazz artist.  Click on the songs and it transports you to a fun time that requires a Latino wine.
  • The Cejas have posted a photo album called “In the Beginning” that tells the story of the winery’s roots.  You can see the passion and enthusiasm in the faces of the family members.  After checking out their page, you get a true sense of who they are and what their wines mean to them.
One family in the Ceja gang - Ariel, Amelia, Navek, Dalia and Pedro Ceja

One family in the Ceja gang - Ariel, Amelia, Navek, Dalia and Pedro Ceja

  • Most importantly, the Cejas respond to comments personally and regularly.  Muy bueno!!