Posts Tagged ‘Wine Blogs’

Winery Resource Alert: The State of Wine Industry Social Media

logoVinTank

More than likely, if you’re reading this post, you have an interest in gaining a detailed understanding of social media platforms and those that are most relevant to the health and happiness of your winery’s business. A group of the industry’s top thought leaders at VinTank, Derek Bromley and Tom Wark have compiled the first whitepaper specifically for the wine industry entitled, “The State of Wine Industry Social Media.”

The paper contains some tech-speak that may look a bit scary at first, but hang in there and read through to the end. These guys are in-the-know, have strong relationships in the wine industry with bloggers, traditional media and developers and seek to help you, the winery principal, to navigate and gain an understanding of the social media landscape. Facebook, Twitter, Wine Blogs, Wine Social Networks, Gary V and Wine Library TV are detailed specifically pertaining to their relevance to wineries and wine retailers.

Paul Mabray and team are eager to receive questions or input on the report and can be reached at: ADDRESS: 1250 Main Street Suite #270 Napa, CA 94559 • PHONE: 800.605.8265 • WEB: vintank.com • EMAIL: info@vintank.com
TWITTER: twitter.com/vintank • FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/14R1mf

Or comment on the Tasting Room blog at pressdemocrat.com http://tastingroom.pressdemocrat.com/default.asp?item=2375378

A special thank you to the VinTank team for mentions of myself, my client Andrew Kamphuis at Vin65 and senior strategist and wine blogger friend, Michael Wangbickler, on their thank you page.

UPDATE (5/12/09)

If you would like to listen to Paul Mabray discuss some of the key findings of the report, check this out http://www.newwineconsumer.com/2009/05/vintank/

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Social Media Quick Tips: Blog Commenting Do’s and Don’ts

As a follow-up to the Social Media Workshop I conducted with Finger Lakes Wine Country Tourism Marketing Association last week, I will be offering quick tips on best practices and worst practices in social media engagement.

We discussed the value of commenting on wine blogs to build your personal brand and expertise.  One of the things I advised was to comment in a way that isn’t self-promotional, full of fluffy marketing speak, etc. but rather as a way to continue the conversation that is already going on in the post, to add a new perspective on a topic or to educate.  Of course most blogs allow you to include a hyperlink to your winery’s website or blog so that if a reader wishes to he/she can click on the link to find out more about you.

I forgot to mention that it is not advisable or looked upon favorably to promote your own events or  products directly in the comments section.  Bloggers decide what they feel is relevant in creating the content for their readers.  If you write your own event or product content as a blatant way of using the blog for advertising purposes, the blogger and the blog’s readers are likely to be offended by that.

By all means, don’t let this advice scare you from commenting.  I read recently that fear of attack is one of the reasons most readers lurk and don’t comment on blogs.  Just think it through and be authentic, provide insight, resources, a fresh perspective on topic and you’ll see that your comments will be well received.

Bringing the Wines of New York to the Wine Bloggers Conference

032When Lenn Thompson, Publisher and Editor of LENNDEVOURS blog, and I decided to attend the Wine Bloggers Conference in Sonoma last month, the wheels in Lenn’s head started turning, looking for an opportunity to get our beloved NY wines in front of a group of wine bloggers from around the country and beyond sometime during our gathering. He asked me to help him to gather a selection of wines from the Finger Lakes AVA and have them shipped out to our wine blogger friend, Russ Beebe of winehiker witiculture, the official blog for californiawinehikes.com who took great care of them for us. The tasting was structured as a casual, and self-guided overview of NY wines with Lenn opening the bottles and placing them on the countertops of the kitchen area at the center of the gathering of around 40 bloggers who were invited. As Lenn outlined in his post about reactions to the New York wines, it was the end of a long day with many wines already poured during the day’s earlier events, so this casual setting was well-received. For reactions to specific wines, please see Lenn’s post and watch for updates on Open Wine Consortium.

034Thank you to all of the wineries who submitted their wines for the tasting. A recommended next step would be to follow up with some of the bloggers in attendance with additional wine submissions for their review (for those who accept submissions), from the comfort of their homes, now that they have had an overview of NY wines.  Feel free to contact me directly if you’re interested in discussing this strategy.

Dr. Konstantin Frank was one of the winery sponsors of the Wine Bloggers Conference and a review of the submitted 2006 Rkatsiteli is posted on my new friend, (and fearless WBC chauffeur) Remy Charest’s blog The Wine Case.

Posts from Attendees of the Wine Bloggers Conference

Would you like to keep updated on many of the posts from the attendees of the Wine Bloggers Conference?  If so, visit the page where attendees are posting links to their blog posts on Open Wine Consortium.  And check back often to see the latest.  I think it will take quite awhile for us to complete all there is to write about from the Wine Bloggers Conference!

Wine Bloggers Conference in Sonoma: An Online Community Connects and Demonstrates the Collaborative Nature of Social Networking

My expectations for the first Wine Bloggers Conference were high when I decided to attend early this summer. After months of getting to know several wine bloggers on Open Wine Consortium and Twitter, I was going to have the opportunity to meet my friends and fellow wine bloggers in person. I know it may seem strange to hear me call a bunch of people I’ve never met in person my friends, but that’s what they are.

As a community, we have cheered on each other’s achievements and new ventures. We have jumped in to provide insights, ideas and resources with enthusiasm. We have comforted each other when one of us is down in the dumps or not feeling well. And like all other friends, we can pick good fights in jest, debate a point of relevance (or non-relevance!) and be mad at one another one day, but not the next. We have come to count on and deeply respect each other, whether or not we agree on things.

We share a love and passion for wine and those involved in the industry. We are excited to learn more, share our insights and push the envelope forward to better ourselves and our blogs. This is a strong, vibrant and exciting community and I’m very honored to be a part of it.

This weekend, I met many of my blogger friends and happily recognized several by face from their avatars which made it very easy to walk up and introduce myself or have someone seek me out. The awkwardness that usually accompanies breaking the ice with conference attendees was not an issue, as was pointed out by Joel Vincent of Open Wine Consortium, one of the Wine Bloggers Conference organizers when he addressed us during his wrap up speech today. Another tremendous advantage of social networking, in my opinion.

This first post on the conference is a foundation for the others that will follow to report on more specifics and important take aways. I have some new insights on the Finger Lakes Region after seeing some of Sonoma County. I will fill you in on new ideas that were uncovered at the conference. And I’ll walk you through some more specifics of our weekend activities as soon as I am feeling back to myself. I am still not well after suffering from motion sickness on the bus ride back from our dinner at Sebastiani, but I’ll report more soon and have some great photos to share with you as well.