Posts Tagged ‘Wine Public Relations’

Academy of Wine Communications-FLX: February Meeting this Thursday, 2/25/10

AWC FLX members Kim Aliperti, Billsboro Winery & Erica Paolicelli, Three Brothers Wineries & Estates taste Ravines Wine Cellars '07 Dry Pinot Rose'

Update: February meeting canceled due to winter storm warning for the region.  We’re working on setting up our next meeting for Thursday, 3/18/10.  Watch here for more details.

February’s meeting of the Finger Lakes Chapter of the Academy of Wine Communications will be held on Thursday, February 25, 2010 at Three Brothers Wineries & Estates at Stoney Lonesome Wine Cellars on Seneca Lake, 623 Lerch Road in Geneva, NY.  The meeting will be held from 10:00 AM-12:30 PM with breakfast provided by Three Brothers Wineries & Estates.  Attendees: feel free to bring a bottle to share during the meeting and RSVP for new members is greatly appreciated ASAP to Melissa Dobson at (917) 816-5424 or melissa.dobson@avantguild.com.

Topics to include:

  • Identifying wine influencers
  • How to turn wine blog reviews into sales $$
  • New York Cork Report: Mini-Rieslings: Hazlitt Hopes To Take a Major Step With Customers http://bit.ly/cm6Ydf, alternative packaging
  • Viticulture 2010 takeaways: Erica Paolicelli of Three Brothers Wineries & Estates
  • Vino Visit and Cellar Pass

If you haven’t joined us yet, check us out. Wineries and wine marketing groups that have attended include: Heron Hill Winery, Splash The Finger Lakes, Finger Lakes Tourism Alliance, Damiani Wine Cellars, Ravines Wine Cellars, Finger Lakes Wine Country Tourism Marketing Association, Anthony Road Wine Company, Three Brothers Wineries & Estates, Sheldrake Point Vineyard and Cafe, Red Newt Cellars, Rooster Hill Vineyards, Shaw Vineyard and New York Wine & Culinary Center.  Bring a favorite bottle and your notebook, it’s a great excuse to get out and talk wine marketing over a glass of vino with Finger Lakes winery owners and marketers.  See you there!

Update: Academy of Wine Communications Finger Lakes Chapter

awcmasthead

Earlier this summer, I wrote about the development of the Academy of Wine Communications Finger Lakes Chapter. With the announcement of the AWC’s new website today, it’s time for an update.

The AWC has recognized that there’s a need for an organization that will become the go-to resource for wine writers, bloggers as they seek sources within the industry to interview for articles and posts.  Having this  information readily available on the AWC site will be a time saver for both writers/bloggers and PR and marketing representatives and becomes a first step in getting them connected.

The rapidly changing wine communications industry has made it difficult to keep up with the latest in best practices for engaging with wine writers and bloggers.  The Academy of Wine Communications plans to open and facilitate conversations surrounding these topics in order to keep members up to speed and ready to apply traditional methods and the latest in social technologies to help them tell their winery’s stories, establish trusted relationships with writers/bloggers and plant the seeds for coverage in a manner in which writers and bloggers want to be engaged with.

I’ve been honored with the role of Finger Lakes Chapter Director of the AWC. My goal is to organize and facilitate a strong chapter here in order to help keep the Finger Lakes wine region in-the-know, front and center in the world of wine public relations and marketing.  With the increase in interest in the region and the people behind the numerous wineries here, it’s prime time to continue actively collaborating and pushing forward.  Let’s do all we can to make it easy for writers and bloggers to contact us and get the information, photos, videos and samples needed in a buttoned-up, efficient manner so that those writers and bloggers will come back for future articles and posts.  One of the best ways to stay updated on things is to reach out to and participate in conversations with wine communicators in other regions.

With that, our first meeting will be an info session to discuss the organization and get your input on the shape of our chapter.  I’m working on the details but look for it to be sometime in November after Harvest, and you can count on a glass of wine or two.  What are some of the things that you would like to see the Academy of Wine Communications help you with?  In the meantime, check out the Resources pages on the site for info that can help you right away.  And be sure to  submit your contact information to be included in the Wine PR Directory.

Academy of Wine Communications-Finger Lakes Chapter

AWC

I have recently joined a group that I foresee as one of the future.  The Academy of Wine Communications is a group of forward-thinking wine and food communications professionals interested in collaborating and shaping the future of the industry.  The AWC is fueled by the passion of my colleagues, Michael Wangbickler of Balzac Communications and Caveman Wines blog who is the Executive Director and Lisa Adams Walter of Adams Walter Communications, Assistant Director.  The AWC is built on the vision of original founders Paul Wagner, Harvey Posert and Sam Folsom.

The AWC has roots in the Napa/Sonoma region but has its eyes on networking and creating chapters throughout the U.S. and beyond.  The first meeting of members and prospective members took place on June 30th at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone where this video was shot.  Michael walks attendees through the history and vision of the AWC…and specifically calls out the Finger Lakes region as one that we’re looking to create a vibrant chapter in.  I can think of several wine PR friends here that I would love to see get involved in our chapter’s development: the Academy of Wine Communications-Finger Lakes Chapter.

As you know, wine public relations and communications is changing rapidly and it’s challenging to keep up with the latest developments and best practices.  Social media is a powerful way for wineries and other wine businesses to engage and tell their stories to their prospective customers and current customers.  There is a unique ability for wineries to personally respond to inquiries which is a tremendous relationship builder for them beyond tasting room interaction.   By getting involved with the AWC, you can network and collaborate with other wine public relations and communications people throughout the national membership chapters and share insights on what’s working and what isn’t in new media, specifically in the wine and culinary industries.

We will also work to become a resource for bloggers and journalists who are looking for industry experts and creative content ideas.  Social media allows wine PR people to get to know bloggers and journalists on a more personal level and keep attuned to their preferences and needs.  The AWC is using social media tools such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn,  slideshare  and video sharing platforms like Ustream to update members and prospective members about the group’s activities.

It’s with this type of forward thinking, collaboration and sharing that an up-and-coming region like ours will move forward and gain more visibility…and respect.

Gary Vaynerchuk on Telling Your Own Story

I strongly agree with Gary on the changing PR landscape.  I embrace my role as an adviser  to my clients, not a canned pitch writer. I highly recommend that you interface with journalists and bloggers in the places where they prefer to meet and get to know you, nowadays that is via social media more times than not.  As a business owner, it’s in your best interest to humanize your communications with media, bloggers and industry influencers.  Provide resources, jump in and help your contacts from time to time.  Get to know them way before you need them to help you tell your story.  Become the face behind your brand.

Winery Marketing: Where’s Your Winery’s Media Site?

Fox Run Vineyards Winemaker Peter Bell

Fox Run Vineyards Winemaker Peter Bell

One of the things I absolutely love about the wine public relations business is that there is so much to learn.  Therefore, I love to incorporate teleseminars and webinars into my work week as much as I possibly can.  Yesterday, during a Bulldog Reporter teleseminar on blog pitching best practices, several bloggers revealed their likes and dislikes for receiving information to be considered for posts on their blogs.

One of the panelists made mention of how he is looking for information and he’s looking for it quickly.  He said that if you can provide what he needs to compose a blog post and include videos/pictures, quick facts and contact information, your chances of being blogged about increase dramatically. (As a blogger myself, I couldn’t agree more)

This blogger panelist gave an example of a great media room that delivers just what he’s looking for.  The Chrysler Media Site provides a drop down list of items called “What Do You Need Fast?” that includes images, bios, fact sheets,videos, logos, press kits and several other things that make it quick and easy for a blogger or journalist to pull updated, relevant information on the company.

Here’s the truth.  Bloggers and journalists are pressed for time, need fresh content and they need it now.  If you provide them with what they’re looking for and save them the time required to track it down or ask for it from you, they will appreciate it and they will see that you respect their time and have the foresight to provide them with the information that they want.  They will like you for it and they will pay more attention to your pitches in the future.

Here’s a wine industry example of a media room from Israeli Wine Direct.  Notice the links to their logos, fact sheet  and blog/podcast.  And their media contact information is clearly shown.  I would recommend adding some videos that are easily embeddable and reinforce your winery’s key messages and branding, bios with photos and a nice assortment of other images.  For a winery, wine technical sheets and images should be added.  And keep this information fresh and updated.  The bloggers on the call mentioned a study result that revealed that blog posts without photos or video are very often skipped over by readers, so they are hungry for them.

I wholeheartedly encourage you to put someone on this if you’re looking to increase your chances of receiving coverage on blogs and in the media.  Of course, then there’s the task of continually serving up creative and compelling “news hooks.”  But that’s for another post.